Speed up development with some ES7 features.

We all have got our hands dirty with ES6 already and loved it. React Native supports some of the ES7 features out of the box so no additional setup is required to use them. Let me introduce you to some of the ES7 features which will surely help you speed up your development:

Class properties instead of constructor

We all have used constructor() in our class components, used .bind while calling class member functions and faced problems accessing this.setState or this.props. Unfortunately, that's how ES6 classes work. I am not going to explain why we need to do all this (there are better resources available online to understand that 😉). But I can tell you a really interesting ES7 feature which you will love. Let me introduce you to ES7 Class instances.

By using this feature, you can define class members (state for eg.) without the need of constructor.

Before:

class SomeComponent extends Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.state = {
      count: 0
    }
  }
  ...
}

After:

class SomeComponent extends Component {
  state = {
    count: 0
  }
  ...
}

Arrow functions instead of class methods

Using the above feature, we can also define arrow functions as class instances and since arrow functions do not have their own scope, this inside arrow function will always point to the class. Therefore you do not need to do binding of this inside constructor. And in most of the cases, you would not be required to use constructor at all. In our project, we never used constructor in any of the components 🤘

Before:

class SomeComponent extends Component {
  _incrementCounter() {
    this.setState({count: this.state.count+1})
  }
  constructor() {
    this._incrementCounter = this._incrementCounter.bind(this);
  }
  ...
}

After:

class SomeComponent extends Component {
  _incrementCounter = () => {
    this.setState({count: this.state.count+1})
  }
  ...
}

Object rest spread

ES6 already supports array spread operator. You can use the same syntax for objects as well. So instead of writing Object.assign({},a,{b:2}), we can directly use {...a, b:2}.

You might say that there is nothing new in this. But if used well, it can make your React code much more beautiful and clean. Let me show you the code before and after using spread operator.

Before

class SomeComponent extends Component {
  static defaultProps = {
    someProp: {}
  }
  render() {
    const someProp = this.props.someProp;
  }
}

After

class SomeComponent extends Component {
  render() {
    const {someProp={}} = this.props;
  }
}

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